Tag Archives: new

Borrowed

It’s really interesting the cultural shift towards lending out what you don’t use for others. You can rent someone’s house for the weekend, have someone give you a lift in their car, use someone’s place as storage… it’s interesting people are becoming more conscious of maximizing their resources (not being wasteful… is that what sustainability means?), and in the proper American way of “how can I make money off this?” It’s like in cultures where it’s common to have big, close families all the sharing happens within the little ‘tribe,’ but here we seem to not have that, and instead pay for the same service and favors. It’s Iike paying a fee to have that communal feeling of generosity–because it is not expected of us.

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Goodbye

Two people lived on a small man-made island just off the shore of the mainland. These two residents were not the only people on this island, but they lived alone. The residents were both on a schedule, both lived through their days as a series of habits, and were both looking for love (trust me. I’m an omniscient narrator). They both worked hard and found comfort in a solid routine as the foundation for a ‘good life,’ and thus were both bound by their schedules — “imprisoned” might be a better word.

A unique feature of this island is that it was a perfect circle with a sidewalk that hugged the perimeter. There were twelve equally spaced streets radiating from a where a big clock tower stood in the heart of the town. You could keep track of the time from almost anywhere on the island, as our two residents would frequently do.

You see, even time is man-made. Not the concept of time, but how we choose to restrict ourselves with it. Seconds. Hours. Years — don’t tell me nothing lasts forever. I don’t want to hear it.

Every morning these two residents would wake up at the same time, step onto the same sidewalk, turn right, and walk clockwise until they came back to where they started. Their schedules wove together like two gears — however, they lived on opposite sides of the island and always walked clockwise at the same time. What these two residents didn’t realize, and would never come to realize, is that this ordinary, scheduled walk was so precise, so routine, and so expected, that the absence of anticipation surrounding it drew about as much attention to the walk as you will give to your next breath, which is extraordinary. Extraordinarily dull.

It is still unclear to me, the omniscient narrator, whether the two residents scheduled to walk each morning, or whether they walked because the schedule told them to. Of course, the residents think to be in complete control, and that is why they stick to the schedule — the sense of order and control — but from the outside looking in, it seems as if control was simply an illusion created by the predictability of a clock.

When you do something so much, you don’t even know what you’re missing anymore; you just assume it’s not there.

Our two residents would wake up every day, go on their clockwise walk, and eventually fall asleep in the same bed they woke up in, and repeated this controlled, scheduled, living habit for so many days that the memories of the past years of this routine congealed into one solitary memory. One day, one of the residents noticed they looked older, felt older, and consequently tried to recall how that happened, but could only come to the conclusion that “time flies.” It was at this time, I, the omniscient narrator, decided this resident decided to go for a walk that morning. The same walk as always, but upon this day this resident choose to walk counterclockwise as a gesture of change, as a way to motivate this resident to start breaking the very routine that this resident had resided in for so long.

It was free. It was clear. It was new. Surely memories would be made on this day as the two residents approached each other around the bend of the man-made island. They were destined to meet. As their paths crossed, they greeted each other with a congenial smile accompanied by a neighborly “hello,” and kept on walking down the path without breaking stride, or their respective schedules. A whole history of new possibilities came into existence on that unclockwise walk, and then disappeared as simply as the path on which they walked curved out of sight around the island, and disappeared without the memory of even saying ‘goodbye.’

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Caterpillar

Hollow and vacant he froze there at last
—alone, abandoned— a shell of his past.
The living cage, the bane of this man,
releases his soul in new form cast.

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Rush

I have a knack of always beating the rush to a line, but I never really checked to see if I was actually just holding up the line and making it longer.

…Nah. That’s impossible.

 

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Hey, you wanna go weave some baskets tomorrow?

You know what? Yeah, I do. Now that I’ve cleared my schedule a bit I should be free.

Do I need to get my ears checked, or did you actually say yes to something?

I’m learning not to put too many things on my plate.

Life is a buffet… and I’m hungry.

Then you should put more on your plate.

No; I’m actually hungry. Like, separate from any analogous implications.

You should eat something.

I can always count on you for good ideas.

So where are we going to do some basket weaving?

I honestly didn’t think that far. I thought you’d say no, so I just said something random.

Oh.

So what do you want to do?

Try basket weaving.

I don’t even know how to weave a basket; let’s do something else.

Come on, it can’t be that bad. When we’re done you’ll have a basket, instead of  video games or something where all you have is gained weight from eating Cheetos.

But it’s basket weaving. It’s boring, and they have holes. I’d rather just buy a bowl or something.

Don’t you want to be able to say you made it though?

Since when was that ever cool? From what I’ve learned, it’s much better to have people make things for you.

You need to try new things, it’d be good to broaden your horizon.

Eh. My horizon’s pretty broad, I just don’t take panoramas.

I think your camera’s broken.

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hokey

You put your mortgage in.

You take your pension out.

You rip your resumé up and you shake it all about.

You do the hokey pokey and you turn your life around.

That’s what it’s all about.

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Time spent overcoming fear.

Make a New Year’s revolution.

Can you hear the retribution?

Brand new day; brand new year.

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